6 Fun Interactive Books for Adults


I’ve slowly picked these different books up over the past year and I’ve had so much fun with them that I wanted to write about them! Have you tried any of these out? What are some of your favorite interactive books?

  • Music Listography. This is easily the one I’ve written in most, and my favorite of the Listography books (I’ll be featuring three in this post.) I found it barely used at a thrift shop and it tickled my music-addicted soul pink. There are so many lists to fill out; I’ve loved documenting my favorite songs by decade (90s list is the longest!) I’m taking my time with it, enjoying the questions and pondering which 20 albums WOULD I take to space with me? 😛

  • Me, You, Us. This was designed to do with either a significant other OR with different friends and pals, with a place at the top for the names and date of who you’re talking about. I bought this as something fun to do with my boyfriend as a silly conversation starter and something to bond over or make us think about “us” and it’s terribly fun! I need to have a pack of crayons with me for the next round, because one could easily add on pictures and drawings on each page. I love it!

  • Spirit Listography. I bought this with an amazon gift card; I haven’t looked at it closely, but it’s a mix of intrapersonal reflecting and proactive “make the world a better place” type mix of prompts to list.I’d much prefer more intrapersonal questions to reflect on, but it seems a decent mix. Plus the cover is gorgeously beautiful. I’m happy with it! And in usual Listography fashion, it has the most quaint little illustrations with each list that I enjoy rediscovering as I flip the page.

  • Wreck This Journal. My sister in another state Rebecca bought me this during my first visit to Georgia when we went bookstore prowling together. It was the first time I’d seen it in person and I couldn’t leave it behind. This is as interactive as you can get with a book. It wants you to throw it, tear it, do everything it says on each page and its stupid therapeutic amazing fun! This would be the best thing to take with you on a camping trip even where you can throw it as hard as you like without it sailing into the neighbor’s yard. 😄

  • My Future Listography. I’m pretty sure I found this with the music book. Basically, you fill in the different lists about what you hope to do, visit, see, or read, ect. I filled in bits and pieces of it, and have already looked back through and been to checkmark some as done! I like seeing how my wishes or wants change as time goes by too; a perfect little time capsule to remind you what the past you wanted to do, or to see how far you’ve come!

  • The Amazing Story Generator. I love this book; it creates some of the most creative and silly and challenging story prompts ever! I bought it off Amazon with birthday money it’s really fun to keep around for a laugh or challenge! If you’re a by-the-seat-of-your-pants fiction writer, I’d highly recommend for kicking writer’s block in the butt or for a fun random challenge! See picture below for an example of how this book works!

Do you have any favorite interactive books?

~Jamie

To-Read List || Topic: Fiction


I’ve been using Goodreads more to find interesting fictional books… mostly fantasy. I’ve found several that I’m one hundred percent positive I’m going to read throughout the year, unless I find better ones along the way. 😄

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All the synopsises on Goodreads intrigued me to a certain degree, so I think they’ll take me on some good adventures…at least I hope so! Besides these, I want to start reading the Harry Potter books too. Right now I have an audio book of The Sorcerer’s Stone that I’ll try listening to! 😀

I completed The Night Circus awhile back, and I highly recommend it to all you book nerds. It’s book of many descriptions, very detailed and delicate but not exhausting to read; a major plus for me! Together they beautifully paint an enchanting black and white circus which is used as the curiously odd battle ground for two magicians. The genre is romance, but it actually took a long time for any of it to happen, which is fine by me. 😄

I completely enjoyed it, and am desperate to find any book similar to it! ALSO IT NEEDS A HIGH QUALITY TV SERIES. *gasp* ACTUALLY THIS BOOK WAS MADE FOR ANIME OMGOSH *melts*

What fictional books am I reading right now? I’m on break at the moment, but I’m about to pick up The Scorpio Races from the library this week! It’s my next challenge! Have you read The Scorpio Races or The Night Circus? Have you read any of the books on my to-read list? Any bad apples in there I should maybe avoid? 😀

~Jamie

To-Read: Part 2 || Topic: Creative Writing


Today I’m posting Part 2 of my To-Read list of creative writing books. I’m still so excited to have found so many wonderful books from the library and I can’t wait to read them all. (I shall try to pull together my to-read list of fictional books soon). Check out Part 1 here if you missed it!

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20 Master Plots and How to Build Them by Ronald B. Tobias. I’ve read several chapters in this already and it has completely changed how I look at plots! The book is focused how to write classic plots successfully; such master plots include Action, Quest, Rescue, Love and Underdog! I will definitely be returning to this book in the future since it’s been great so far. Highly recommended!

Advice to Writers: A Compendium of Quotes, Anecdotes, and Writerly Wisdom From a Dazzling Array of Literary Lights complied and edited by Jon Winokur. This book is all advice that look like quotes or foturne cookies, organized under categories like Characters, Dialogue, Genres, Money, Reading ect. I’ve skimmed the book and it’s neat; different advice from different people will often contradict each other, which is pretty funny, haha. This is another book I wish I could underline with pen or set on fire with highlighter ink!

A Writer’s Book of Days: A Spirited Companion & Lively Muse for the Writing Life by Judy Reeves. This is one of those “use for the entire year” books–and I think those books are really neat! This book is wide and flat, covers each month, and discusses different aspects of writing with a tiny writing prompt for each day. I really wouldn’t mind going through this book one year in the future!

Getting the Words Right: 39 Ways to Improve Your Writing by Theodore A. Rees Cheney. This one definitely looks deeper then just your regular “creative writing” book, especially since the author is an editor. The author zeros in on 39 specific subjects to talk about, such as keeping a unified tone throughout your story, when to delete a chapter, and how to use figurative speech. Definitely excited to read this one and apply its advice on my current story!

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How to Write Your Life Story in Ten Easy Steps by Sophie King. (This isn’t really on creative writing, but I got so excited about it that I have to include it. 😄 ) I’ll DEFINITELY be using this book as a guide to capturing my life on paper later in the future. It’s full of suggestions on how to remember things and recount them well. I’m so glad this book exists; simply looking through it made autobiography-writing feel easier–I highly recommend this to those wanting to write about their life!

Thinking Write: The Secret to Freeing Your Creative Mind by Kelly L. Stone. This one looks kinda neat as it has more of a relaxation/meditation approach to discovering creativity. I’ve really not seen another creative writing book like it. This one definitely has me intrigued to see what it has to say!

Vex, Hex, Smash, Smooch: Let Verbs Power Your Writing by Constance Hale. This book is pretty thick with smaller text, so it looks rather daunting to me. However, it’s also full of examples and verbs that look really helpful. And I love verbs. So. I’ll give it a try. 😀

Where Do You Get Your Ideas? A Writer’s Guide to Transforming Notions Into Narratives by Fred White. First off, I grabbed this book because of the cover; vintage, personalitiy, and turquoise, lol. This book looks pretty neat, as it guides you through the story’s idea, plotting on paper, and then writing the first draft. As a panster who could use help with actual plotting before writing, this could be a good read that I’ll definitely give it a go.

Wired for Story: The Writer’s Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence by Lisa Cron. I love this idea for a writing book. Readers use their brains to read but how does the brain work and how can we take advantage of it to get them sucked into our story? Before I publish, I hope to read through this book and use what I can in my story. I love psychology anyway, so understanding a bit more in the world of my craft would be fantastic!

Are there any books on creative writing that I should read? Please recommend one in the comments!

~Jamie

To-Read: Part 1 || Topic: Creative Writing


I haven’t done a list in a while, so I thought I might as well blog this year’s To-Read lists. 😄 Currently, I have each of these books borrowed from the library and am peeking into each of them–so this list is something of an impressions post. I think it would be handy to record my thoughts on them, since I won’t be able to read them all at once.

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Bullies Bast#rds & B#tches: How to Write the Bad Guys of Fiction by Jessica Page Morrell. This looks like a good read, with certain chapters covering the different types of villains. While I think I need more help writing compelling, realistic heroes (more practice, is more like it,) it never hurts to learn more on the baddie topic. They can also be tougher to write.

Crafting Novels & Short Stories from the editors of the Writer’s Digest. THIS book looks like one I might personally buy just so I can underline and dog tag pages. Just from the Getting Started intro I wanted to mark up a dozen different lines. It looks sharp, smart, and to-the-point. Definitely high at the top of the list to read!

Pep Talks, Warnings & Screeds: Indispensable Wisdom and Cautionary Advice for Writers by George Singleton. This one looks awesome. Everything is in short paragraphs which are quick to read and to-the-point. Some of them are like fortune cookies–I like honest writing advice in this format. There are also cute pictures dashed in too. I wouldn’t be surprised if this one became a “want-to-buy” as well.

The Daily Writer: 366 Meditations to Cultivate a Productive and Meaningful Writing Life by Fred White. I’ve actually borrowed this about four years ago so it feels pretty new to me, lol. There’s a page for each day with a prompt at the bottom. I love the cover and the layout and the diverse topics for reading. Another possible “must buy”.

The Pocket Muse and The Pocket Muse: Endless Inspiration by Monica Wood. I LOVE. THESE. BOOKS. Their pretty small but are bursting with inspiration. Between each cover they’re filled with images and prompts set up in unique ways to inspire a creative spark! I own “Endless Inspiration” but I think I’ll need to get the rest of the series too! (Not pictured.)

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Writing: A User Manual by David Hewson. Already sent this one back, but I think once I get through some of the others I’ll come back to it…looked a little like dull reading, but who knows for sure. 😄

Word Hero: A Fiendishly Clever Guide to Crafting the Lines that get Laughs, go Viral and Live Forever by Jay Heinrichs. Full of colorful words that aren’t too ridiculous, this book is exactly as it says it is: how to use words in a memorable way! I look forward to reading through this one to widen my vocabulary and use those words well! I have high hopes for this one!

Writing Monsters: How to Craft Believably Terrifying Creatures to Enhance Your Horror, Fantasy, and Science Fiction by Philip Athans. I’ve read the foreword, intro, and the first chapter, and the author seems to have a great perspective of what exactly a monster is or can be, so I have very high hopes for this book. I love that in the beginning there’s a section for filling out details for your monster, immediately equipping me as a writer! This book looks fantastic, and I’ll be reading through this one first as I need monster ideas and tips for my video game novel.

Write Starts: Prompts, Quotes and Exercises to Jumpstart Your Creativity by Hal Zina Bennett. I actually own this one already, I ordered it on Amazon to reach the free shipping level, lol. More short chapters with neat exercises and prompts! I hope to get some good creativity spurts out of this one!

Writing 21st Century Fiction: High Impact Techniques For exceptional Storytelling by Donald Maass. The title itself made me pull it off the shelf. Sometimes certain how-to-write/publish books are becoming dated as the style of storytelling changes, so I like to find a book that’s aware of the times. Hopefully it will be worth the time to peruse through the pages.

That’s the end of part 1 (yes, I have a second stack of books just from the creative writing section.) Have any of you read/used books on writing, prompts or publishing that were helpful? If you do/don’t read these types of books, why or why not?

~Jamie